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March 2, 2010

An Agent's Take

Crisis Management

by Joshua Kusnick

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Josh Kusnick is a Fort Lauderdale, Florida-based agent who will periodically write about his experiences representing professional baseball players and media personalities.

Everyone has an idea of what it is that I do. People have a perception of what all agents do. Some people think we're monsters ruining the purity of America's pastime while others don’t know we exist. Just about everything valuable that I have learned in this business has come from good old-fashioned experience. There are certain things that I have learned by people teaching me directly, while there are other things, valuable things, that I have been forced to learn on the fly. One example is crisis management. Unless you have advised someone in a major crisis situation, you wouldn't have any idea. This is not something you learn in school. It is something born from experience.

During the 2009 season, I had a client suspended for failing to comply with the minor-league drug testing program. This was not the first time this player was suspended for this offense and, from my perspective, this could potentially be an atomic bomb to his career. Fans rarely get to see the human impact of things like this but tend of primarily think about the impact they have on their favorite team. There are lives and families at stake, and as an agent, it is my responsibility to make sure that the family and the player are calmed no matter how bad the situation may seem. Think Phil Ivey pushing all in with 7/2 off suit at the final table at Binions. It's that serious, because a young man's career is at stake and, to some degree, so is mine.

To that point, one of the things I see happen behind the scenes all the time is that some agents think they are an autonomous body. Wrong. Without the players, an agent is just a guy. I never forget that. I literally am nobody without my clients. I have no career without my clients. My career is completely codependent on the choices these men make, and I am subject to the whims of their frailty.

When I got news of my player's suspension, I was at a movie theater in Cary, North Carolina. I was in Cary because I was scouting a player on the Canadian Junior National Team who had just recently been drafted by the Dodgers. It was around 7 p.m. when I got the call. Up until that point, I wasn't having all that bad of a day. I got to watch several games at the USA Baseball facility, I had dinner with an old friend from high school, and I finally made my way to the theater so I could get some alone time. Much to my chagrin, the only movie starting at the time I arrived at theatre was Transformers 2: Revenge of the Fallen. Now I consider myself to be a movie aficionado, and I knew instantly I would lose my movie cool the second I purchased a ticket to see a Michael Bay film. At that point, I didn’t care because, at worst, I would get to watch Megan Fox "act" for a couple of hours and, at best, I would have some awesome childhood memories come flooding back during the film. Sadly, the only flashback I had came about halfway through when I recalled the epic 1986 cartoon Transformers: The Movie. It was a children’s cartoon, and yet at the end of that movie, Optimus Prime, surrounded by his closest friends and family, dies.

Think about that for a moment. Someone had to write that entire scene, dialogue and all, then pitch it to a director, the art department, the producer. Then everyone involved with the movie had to sign off on the idea that killing an animated children’s hero would be a great idea. Then the animators had to draw those scenes in order to give them to the voiceover department so actors could voice a death sequence that could potentially traumatize millions upon millions of children. Who thinks of these things? I can't believe this was Orson Welles' last film. (Really, you can look that up.)

During that daydream, I got the phone call. When you're an agent, your clients have to come above all else. I feel not only an obligation to my players to be available 24 hours a day, but I consider it a privilege. I feel if my clients believe in me enough to trust them with their careers, then I owe it to them to give them every bit of my soul. I will always answer my phone at 3 a.m. The call came and the player was obviously very upset. I have known this player since he was 15 years old. This player comes from a special family with absolutely incredible parents. This is a good kid. Everyone says that about the players they represent, but I know in my heart this is a good kid. This is the kind of kid who loves people and his career. This player always signs autographs before and after games until everyone has one and always says "sir" or "ma'am" when addressing adults. This is a kid who, unfortunately, has a very serious disease.

I have much experience in dealing with addiction because I grew up that way: I had a very close family member go through the pain and suffering of addiction. Addiction is not a choice. Addiction is very much a disease and, fortunately for this player, he had an agent who was quite sympathetic to his situation. Anger and disappointment I would imagine is the first reaction most people would have in a situation like this. However, I felt nothing but compassion. I knew I would be able to help his career and rehabilitate his life if he let me. So the first phone call came from him. The second phone call came from his mother. We talked, I listened, and I promised her I would do everything in my power to help this situation. I simply told her to trust me and let me do my job. Then I got to work.

The first two phone calls I made were to the two beat writers who cover the player's organization. I broke the news to them immediately because I do not believe in hiding. I believe genuine and absolute contrition is the only path to salvation. I gave quotes to both writers and promised them that the player would be made available, uncoached and totally unplugged, when he was ready to speak. The first step in repairing a damaged image is to apologize, but only if it is sincere. The second step in this process is finding a place for the player to get help for his problem, and that was done with the help of the parent club. Additionally, I had this player contact my family member who was a recovering addict in hopes that somehow that would help him get through his struggles. During the offseason, this player got regular job working for a landscaping business and in a restaurant. I think, in addition to his therapy, working a "normal" job helped put in perspective how lucky he was to be a professional athlete. After his rehabilitation was finished, one final interview was granted before the start of spring training that hopefully answered any lingering questions about the suspension and the problems the player had with addiction. The goal of this interview was to curtail any questions any reporters would have during the season because this absolutely cannot be allowed to be a distraction.

So this is the game plan when things go awry: Get everyone calm, contact the media and apologize, get help, apologize even more, and live up to the promises you have made. It doesn’t take dangerous gypsy magic to rehabilitate an image, just genuine contrition and the desire to right your life. So, as of now, all is well in the universe and the player is looking ahead to 2010 with hope for the first time in a very long time.

I wanted to write about crisis management, because I was disappointed in what I saw from Tiger Woods when he recently apologized for his infidelity. I don’t think anybody with a pulse could have been surprised at the hilariously scripted and staged atmosphere at the press conference. However, this is the kind of ignorance we've come to expect from the cauldron of audacity that is celebrity these days. It was arrogance at its purest. I honestly felt like I was watching the last scene in The Departed, where Matt Damon comes home holding his bag of groceries, and is greeted by Mark Wahlberg wearing nothing but scrubs and Wonderbread bags on his feet. Tiger had the exact same look on his face the entire press conference that Damon had right before the end, and you could sense the entire time that Tiger was just waiting to say "OK" so that the credits would start rolling. You almost expected a CGI mouse to come to the podium and start gnawing on a piece of cheese.

My client is not Tiger Woods, but I do feel he had an obligation to be honest with everyone, including the public, about his transgressions. When you make the decision to work in show business (because that’s what professional sports are), you are subject to different things that most people will ever experience. Fame, money and, in cases of indiscretion, total public embarrassment. It comes with the territory, and the territory isn’t cheap. I know my client is on the right path, and I will stand by his side until he tells me not to because, after all, I am always going to be subject to the whims of his frailty.

The author can be reached at JoshuaKusnick@aol.com and his blog can be found here.

Joshua Kusnick is an author of Baseball Prospectus. 
Click here to see Joshua's other articles. You can contact Joshua by clicking here

Related Content:  The Who,  Addiction,  The Call-up

65 comments have been left for this article. (Click to hide comments)

BP Comment Quick Links

Peter Hood

Interesting article. Is there a significant difference in handling the issue for someone like ARod and a youngster just getting started? Just a curiousity based question but how would you have possibly scripted the Woods fiasco to avoid it being such a travesty?

Mar 02, 2010 08:48 AM
rating: 0
 
SC

I think the problem with the Woods' fiasco was that it was so scripted. While certainly letting Woods just go in front of the cameras without some kind of game plan would have been foolish, as someone who does crisis communications, I would have set up several one-on-one interviews with Dianne Sawyer-types rather than a scripted press conference.

As mentioned, the keys are to get a sincere and meaningful apology out, give the person a chance to explain why they did what they did (whether it was addiction, foolish decisions, or something else), and then talk about "putting it behind them."

Woods took too long to speak to the press, as we say, feed the beast (the media) or the beast will feed on you.

Mar 02, 2010 09:01 AM
rating: 0
 
Richard Bergstrom

I think this is a bit too judgmental. Does anyone really care if an apology is scripted, washed through the PR, and delivered through an agent?

Over the years, we've gone back and forth from Giambi's non-apology apology to Alex Rodriguez's "tell-all" interview with Gammons with tidbits being contradicted the next day. Manny still gets to be Manny (even if a bit more effeminite) and Big Papi doesn't talk much anymore. Yet all these players are "forgiven" and get back their applause from fans even if none of them were as forthcoming as, say, a Pettite.

In the end, if there's anyone besides the writers who care about these apologies, they don't really care what the athlete actually says. Same thing with Tiger.

Mar 02, 2010 09:45 AM
rating: 0
 
eighteen

You forget the sponsors. THEY care what the athlete says, because that determines the athlete's value as mouthpiece/symbol.

Most people couldn't care less about Tiger's daliances; and may not even view him negatively. But they're sure as hell a lot less likely to buy Gatorade and Cadillacs just because he endorses them.

Mar 02, 2010 10:44 AM
rating: 1
 
Richard Bergstrom

Note that sponsors seem to drop athletes after their apologies, not before... and regardless of what they said in their apology. Nike dropped Marion Jones after her apology, Accentuate dropped Tiger Woods after he issued his "statement apology", and now that McGwire has apologized, the Missouri legislature wants to rename his highway.

Mar 02, 2010 19:11 PM
rating: 0
 
ofMontreal

I'm late, but I must say that most people care about what an apology looks like. Maybe someone like "superduperstar A" almost has to have an elaborate platform, but sincerity is almost impossible to mistake. Woods apologized because he was about to lose over half his income. He's a philanderer. He's done nothing illegal. He doesn't owe anyone but his family and friends(maybe) an apology. Our media likes to pretend he owes the public something.

But his sponsors have to please millions of people of all stripes and think a public apology will speed that. Personally I think only time will do it.

Mar 02, 2010 18:58 PM
rating: 0
 
Juris

Good, informative article. Thanks! I imagine a lot of your activity has to do with the parents/families of potential signees or athletes you've already signed. I hope in a future column you might deal with that aspect -- helicopter parents.

Mar 02, 2010 08:56 AM
rating: 5
 
JoshuaKusnick

Thank you and maybe.

Mar 02, 2010 09:38 AM
rating: 2
 
singy111
(886)

Great article, especially to see the other side of the game. Hope to see more on the site.

Mar 02, 2010 09:03 AM
rating: 4
 
JoshuaKusnick

I have 7 articles finished so far but I am currently taking topic suggestions via my email JoshuaKusnick@aol.com

Mar 02, 2010 09:38 AM
rating: 2
 
philly

I enjoyed this and look forward to more from the agent perspective.

If you're looking for topics of interest, I'd love to hear more about how agents recruit clients and shephard them thru the draft.

Mar 02, 2010 09:05 AM
rating: 1
 
amazin_mess

Good article, Josh. Thanks!

Mar 02, 2010 09:06 AM
rating: 3
 
Schere
Other readers have rated this comment below the viewing threshold. Click here to view anyway.

Interesting stuff, but couldn't BP do Mr. Kusnick the favor of copy editing the article before posting it?

Mar 02, 2010 09:20 AM
rating: -10
 
JoshuaKusnick

http://39ontheline.blogspot.com/

Mar 02, 2010 09:41 AM
rating: 0
 
srausch10
Other readers have rated this comment below the viewing threshold. Click here to view anyway.

This is good? I thought it was meandering, self-aggrandizing and not particularly compelling. Can you honestly compare managing a minor league player’s positive test for illegal drugs to revelations of Tiger Woods’ infidelity? In the first place, while I understand that numerous suspensions for use of recreational drugs are harmful to a player’s career, I don’t see it primarily as a PR problem. Whether it’s right, the public is generally concerned with PEDs, rather than recreational drugs, and usually only when it comes to players we’ve heard of. For instance, most of the public look at Josh Hamilton’s story as one of struggle and redemption, even with his recent relapse. Compare that to the reactions to the Manny Ramirez suspension and A-Rod’s steroid admission. This is not to say that using – and being caught using – recreational drugs is not a problem. But in this case, quitting drugs is the most important thing, rather than making a sincere apology to the public. Or to put it another way, this player’s apology could be 100 percent sincere and it would be essentially meaningless if he continues to use drugs. The public has shown it is willing and even eager to support athletes who overcome drug addiction. The crisis here is the addiction itself.

Also, can someone get this guy an editor? I count more than 180 words about Transformers. Not. Relevant.

Mar 02, 2010 09:47 AM
rating: -17
 
Lou Doench

"Also, can someone get this guy an editor? I count more than 180 words about Transformers. Not. Relevant."

You had time to count his words about the transformers?
And then bitch about it to us?
Less relevant....

Mar 02, 2010 13:58 PM
rating: 7
 
srausch10
Other readers have rated this comment below the viewing threshold. Click here to view anyway.

Sorry about the euro symbols and tms. pasted this in from Word.

Mar 02, 2010 09:48 AM
rating: -7
 
mymrbig

Thank you for your perspective and the insider look. Happy to see BP is responding to past calls for more insider info into the nuts and bolts of baseball.

I'm a fan of Tiger the golfer, but not his personal actions (I don't understand infidelity from a basic level). But I don't really think your client's situation is comparable to Tigers. First and foremost, your client's transgressions were his alone and while they certainly affected his family, I don't think they affect his family in remotely the same way as Tiger's transgression. It is a lot easier to be open and fully honest with reporters about the public about something like drugs than it is about sex (particularly since Tiger has 2 kids). Second, Tiger is probably the most famous athlete in the world. While I thought the scripted press conference was pretty ridiculous, I don't think (given the subject matter and his celebrity) it is reasonable to sit him down with some reporters and let him go at him with questions.

Again, I really appreciate your insight, I just don't think Tiger's situation is really a useful comparison to what your client (or most baseball players) might go through.

Mar 02, 2010 10:05 AM
rating: 0
 
Richard Bergstrom

*blinks*

Did you just say drugs affect a family less than infidelity?

Mar 02, 2010 10:09 AM
rating: 1
 
mymrbig

Sorry, I meant from a public perspective. Obviously drug use affects a family, but for the most part people don't really clamor to talk to family members about the drug use unless the drug use manifested itself in very public ways regarding family life. However, I think infidelity inherently has the public/press more curious about the spouse and affects on the spouse.

I mean, if Tiger had been caught doing cocaine or something, I just don't see everyone being as focused on Elin and the kids as they are because Tiger cheated. The story would focus more on Tiger and less on Tiger/Elin and Tiger/kids.

I was NOT trying to compare the two problems in terms of which can be more or less devastating to an individual or a family, as obviously that entirely depends on the specific instance and is too subjective to really measure.

Mar 02, 2010 10:32 AM
rating: 1
 
Richard Bergstrom

All I can say is I'm not a psychologist... so I guess I defer to your analysis?

Mar 02, 2010 11:24 AM
rating: 0
 
R.A.Wagman

The type of transgressions involved aside, this issue does affect this player and his family very much - if not more so - than Woods. As the author stated that the player's career was at stake - in other words - he may never be allowed to play again, affecting his earning power and all of is future goals. Woods, on the other hand, may lose his marriage, but will be able to play golf as long as he wants, no matter who he sleeps with.

Mar 02, 2010 18:01 PM
rating: 0
 
mymrbig

Good points, but I'd take my family over my career any day of the week. Present me with one option that might lose me my family and one that might lost me my career, and I'll take my chances on finding a new career.

Mar 03, 2010 08:14 AM
rating: 1
 
Matt Kory

I appreciate the insight, Joshua.

Mar 02, 2010 11:02 AM
rating: 0
 
JoshuaKusnick

Seeing the Tiger Woods fiasco made me want to write about something I was familiar with first hand. I cant comment about a PED suspension because I have never dealt with that kind of crisis. I wasnt trying to compare my guys situation with Tigers at all, I was merely trying to write about my guys situation and what I had to do as his agent to take care of it. I really only added the part about Tiger at the end so I could go Bill Simmons on everyone and use a Departed reference. Hope it didnt detract too much from the article

mahalo

J

Mar 02, 2010 11:23 AM
rating: 3
 
SChandler

I found the article very interesting and enjoyed it. I do take exception to one premise, however. I know in these times of political correctness we don't want to blame anybody for anything, but take it from someone who has had addictions, addiction is a weakness, not a disease.

Mar 02, 2010 11:23 AM
rating: -3
 
JasonC23
(97)

Can't wait for the replies to this.

Mar 02, 2010 11:26 AM
rating: 0
 
Mr. Cthulhu

Yeah, take that expert consensus of nuerology and psycology! Who needs your decades of studies and research establishing addictions as a disease? This guy had addictions!

Mar 02, 2010 11:41 AM
rating: -1
 
JoshuaKusnick

Obviously everyone has an opinion on this issue, please don't let the comment section turn into a debate about addiction. Thank you for taking the time to check this out.

Mahalo

J

Mar 02, 2010 11:44 AM
rating: 1
 
drawbb

The problem with this issue is that the medical literature always misses the one incontestable fact that makes addiction not a disease: Addiction is something you can only get by trying the activity the first time VOLUNTARILY.

May 27, 2010 12:11 PM
rating: 0
 
JoshuaKusnick

As I noted earlier, I have about 7 articles completed so far, but I would really like to write about what people are interested in learning about. So, if anyone has any ideas email me or you can post here and I will keep checking during the week. I have some down time available this week and I am writing as much as I can beore the season starts.

Mar 02, 2010 14:01 PM
rating: 1
 
Peter Hood

I don't know if this is possible but a "Myths vs Reality" article about contract negotiations would be interesting.

Mar 03, 2010 10:04 AM
rating: 1
 
Richard Bergstrom

Joshua Kusnick vs Jerry Maguire

Mar 03, 2010 11:07 AM
rating: 0
 
JoshuaKusnick

It would be totally self serving but I could do this

Mar 04, 2010 08:28 AM
rating: 0
 
JoshuaKusnick

I would be interested in doing this one. Im not sure what myths are out there regarding contract negotiations but maybe you could email me some things you'd like me to clear up

Mar 04, 2010 08:29 AM
rating: 0
 
Richard Bergstrom

From an earlier thread a few months back, I remember people wondering what agents when a player is traded. How do they inform the player, do they aid with relocation, etc.

Also, for my own curiosity, perhaps a discussion on the differences between representing US-born amateur draft players and foreign-born free agents?

Mar 02, 2010 14:38 PM
rating: 0
 
JoshuaKusnick

That story a few months back was about my client Josh Bell and had quotes directly from both me and Josh so I dont know how much I could add to that. I do not represent foreign free agents so I cant help you there.

Mar 02, 2010 14:47 PM
rating: 0
 
Richard Bergstrom

At least you know I liked the article enough to remember it and the discussion :)

How about a discussion on how endorsement deals, commercial appearances and public signing appearances work? Information about the process on the business side (the negotiations) and on the player-relation side.

Mar 02, 2010 15:30 PM
rating: -1
 
Richard Bergstrom

Oh, as another idea, how do agents present themselves to athletes that they would like to represent? How does the presentation and pitch itself work? What kinds of things can't agents legally do or say?

Mar 02, 2010 15:34 PM
rating: -1
 
Pat Folz

It's not hard to read between the lines and figure out the player being discussed in the article, so I have a question relevant this particular player's circumstance. Since MLB players cannot be suspended for use of the particular substance in question, and the next positive test results in a lifetime ban, there has been some talk amongst fans that the team should promote him to the Majors as a bullpen arm to preserve his career.

So I guess my question is twofold: does this still hold true given his repeated positive tests in the minors? And if so, do you think such an action would be advisable for a player in his situation, or do the dangers (being unready for MLB competition and/or the "big league lifestyle") make it unwise?

Mar 02, 2010 16:12 PM
rating: 0
 
JoshuaKusnick

No comment.

Mar 02, 2010 17:08 PM
rating: 0
 
thenamestsam

I understand that anything regarding the specific player is sensitive, but I do think the question of how much you help adapt players in going from the majors to the minors might be an interesting discussion topic. Even for guys with no addictions that must be a serious culture shock. Might be an interesting topic to explore in the future

Mar 02, 2010 18:18 PM
rating: 1
 
JoshuaKusnick

you mean from minors to majors? Or did you mean going down from the bigs back to the minors? Sorry if I didnt follow.

Mar 02, 2010 19:16 PM
rating: 0
 
thenamestsam

Yeah that's probably because I typed it wrong. I meant minors to majors, but clearly didn't type that. But both might be interesting. Enjoyed the article.

Mar 03, 2010 15:28 PM
rating: 0
 
Pat Folz

Understandable, and I apologize if I put you in an awkward situation. I worded the second question poorly, I meant it to be more generic than it came out, similar to tsam's. I am mostly wondering about the agent's perspective on when a minor league player is ready for the majors, and what you do if a player is promoted before you think they're ready (or if the promotion is long overdue, a la Brandon Wood). Not to imply your feelings about any player in particular, but this situation must happen from time to time. If you're looking for topics to write about in the future, I think that would be something interesting to touch on.

Mar 02, 2010 19:27 PM
rating: 0
 
JoshuaKusnick

a player is never promoted to the big leagues too early from my end of the table.

Mar 02, 2010 19:41 PM
rating: 1
 
nateetan

While I'm sure that response is the best for you in regards to getting players to represent, it is a categorical fact that some players have had their careers shortened due to being rushed to the bigs.

Perhaps another way to phrase the question: As an agent, do you always rank the desire of the player over what's best for him, in the event those don't match up? (This could be for anything, not just the example of getting to the majors.)

Mar 02, 2010 23:22 PM
rating: 0
 
Richard Bergstrom

If a player is in the majors for a year, they make $400k. Making the major leagues, even briefly, is a financial windfall for a player. I don't care how bright their star is, the best hitting and/or pitching prospects have flamed out or worst, lost their life before getting the opportunity in the bigs.

So, I do think agents are representing a player's best interests by getting them to the majors as fast as possible.

Mar 03, 2010 08:36 AM
rating: 1
 
jtanker33

I liked the article and am interested in hearing more on how agents affect baseball day-to-day. I do have one question. I'm not sure if its worth a whole article, but, it has been pointed out in several places that a certain super-agent seems to use a certain SI/MLBNetwork reporter to float stories that impact negotiations and in return gives that reporter first scoop info when a deal is done. Does the "scouting community" frown on a scout-reporter relationship that could be too close? Or is this the sort of thing that is just "part of the business"? I can't accept "insider info" from the reporter because I know he's a mouthpiece for the agent. This is probably a question best asked of a reporter instead of an agent, but I'm curious to hear more about the scout-reporter relationship.

Thanks again for the piece. I'm looking forward to more.

Mar 03, 2010 05:36 AM
rating: 0
 
JoshuaKusnick

I never put myself in a position where I have authority over a player. It's his life and career not mine. So when it comes to me ranking to the desires of a client vs. whats best for a MQQIRplayers career, I never

Mar 03, 2010 05:55 AM
rating: 0
 
JoshuaKusnick

I never put myself in a position where I have authority over a player. It's his life and career not mine. So when it comes to me ranking to the desires of a client vs. whats best for a players career, I never put myself in a position where I would have to make that choice. I work for the player, I am his employee and as such I will ALWAYS do what is in his best interests or at least what I believe his best interests to be.

Dont know what happened with the last post, someone hopefully will delete it.

Mar 03, 2010 06:03 AM
rating: 0
 
DavidTice

I have to believe this comment will be down-voted into oblivion, but my inner pedant-slash-geek screams to point out that Optimus Prime dies toward the beginning of the '86 animated feature, not in the end. The scene at the end is the elevation of Rodimus Prime.

Mar 03, 2010 07:46 AM
rating: 7
 
JoshuaKusnick

This is the best comment of all time, I cant believe I screwed that up.

Mar 03, 2010 08:15 AM
rating: 1
 
Richard Bergstrom

You got the touch, you got the power...

Mar 03, 2010 08:33 AM
rating: 1
 
dianagram

Nice article ... look forward to reading more, especially about how an agent goes about doing prep work for contract negotiations.

Josh ... are you a lawyer? Do you have a stats background?

And on another matter ... addiction is not a choice, but growing up around addictive personalities probably increases the risk of becoming an addict. And starting drug use IS a choice.

Mar 03, 2010 07:50 AM
rating: 0
 
JoshuaKusnick

I am not a lawyer, my father whom is my partner has been ome for around 30 years. We are both certified mlbpa player agents. The biggest thing I can do that allows me the opportunity to have my career is my ability to independently evaluate talent. I dont have a scouting staff and I dont have to rely on other peoples evaluations when researching a potential client. I think that more than anything has allowed me to have my career.

Mar 03, 2010 08:45 AM
rating: 0
 
mymrbig

Other articles I'd love to hear about from an agent:
(1) How do agents go about contacting players and forming bonds that end up with the agent representing the player (suggested by others).
(2) How do agents handle the "advisor" role for high school players who aren't decided between signing with the team that drafts them and going to school.
(3) Insight into contract negotiations for drafted players.
(4) Insight into arbitration proceedings and preparation.
(5) Insight into contract negotiations for free agents (minor league and major league, elite and role players).

Many thanks!

Mar 03, 2010 08:23 AM
rating: 1
 
Richard Bergstrom

How about the flipside too? When a player leaves an agent, what's the process? I imagine the agent retains copy of paperwork etc. Does that just get sent to the player? Is a summary given on the current pending negotiations to the new agent? What "gentlemen's agreements" are there between agents?

Mar 03, 2010 11:09 AM
rating: 0
 
blw777

Thank you for writing. I am genuinely interested in just what an agent really does - I don't mean that to sound condescending or offensive, either. Far too much of the typical fan's impression of agents comes from one part of what Scott Boras does, and it would be interesting to understand what the rest of his job might be, and especially what the whole job for the more representative group is.

Mar 03, 2010 09:07 AM
rating: 0
 
JoshuaKusnick

I am not so sure how technical I want to get, but rest assured I will be giving out more information than people are used to getting from an agents perspective. I have 7 articles done, close to finishing the 8th and I'm just thinking of things I could possibly write about when these run out. I'm sure Ill be writing about things that happen in season more than anything if BP wants to keep me. Right now is going to be one of the few times I will be able to take readers suggestions and turn them into stories, so keep'em comin

Mahalo
J

I am also debating the merits of talking about 1 specific draft negotiation I handled where a 5th rounder signed for twice the slot. Any interest in this? Email me or post here to let me know

Mar 03, 2010 12:34 PM
rating: 0
 
thenamestsam

Yeah, definitely.

Mar 03, 2010 15:36 PM
rating: 0
 
Richard Bergstrom

Ditto, especially with the recent trend of signing picks for overslot.

Mar 03, 2010 15:54 PM
rating: 0
 
fconnolly

Also interested in the overslot story. Thanks for the article and all the replies.

Mar 05, 2010 00:31 AM
rating: 0
 
SaberTJ

Yes please write this.

Apr 13, 2010 07:59 AM
rating: 0
 
Moneyball16

Cool article. I look forward to more.

Mar 05, 2010 07:55 AM
rating: 0
 
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